0

Arugula, Gorgonzola, and caper pasta

After our very wet spring, the weather is starting to dry and heat up. The arugula in the garden started bolting, so I needed to figure out what to do with it right away. I decided on a simple pasta recipe that combined some things I already had on hand.

I used all my bolting arugula–five small┬áplants. They didn’t provide a huge amount of leaves, but it was enough.

IMG_9604

For the sauce, I very loosely followed this recipe that I found via a Google search.

I used veggie penne because that’s what I had available (I like to sneak in extra vegetables when I can). For the sauce, I used a bit of milk (measuring is not really my thing) and 2 or 3 ounces of Gorgonzola, stirred until the cheese was pretty much melted, then added some capers, the pasta, and the arugula and stirred until the pasta was coated and the arugula was melted. Super easy. I think this might have been even better with mushrooms, though, so I’ll try that next time.
IMG_9609

After a slow start to the garden, I am thrilled to have finally had my first meal this year with produce I grew myself!

0

Tomatoes and cheese

The cherry tomatoes keep coming, and I harvested more today. It had been a few days since I’d last collected them; therefore, several were split or partially eaten. I picked and discarded all the overripe and damaged ones since they were attracting fruit flies and other unsavory characters (but no more hornworms–hooray!). Despite the many that were unusable I still ended up with almost two cups.

IMG_4102

I ate some of them with this beautiful water buffalo mozzarella from Cedar Grove Cheese. I can’t express how pleased I was to find buffalo mozzarella in the US.

IMG_4113

This cheese is wonderful with my cherry tomatoes and fresh basil.

IMG_4115

I also had many tomatoes left over from my last harvest–Jared doesn’t like them and I can’t eat them quickly enough. I thought about freezing them but they were getting a little soft and I read that freezing works best when the tomatoes are nice and fresh. Instead, I made slow-roasted tomatoes following a recipe on Smitten Kitchen. I cut the tomatoes in half, spread them on a cookie sheet, added a generous amount of olive oil, and baked them at 225┬░. I did not add salt, pepper, or herbs as the recipe suggests.

IMG_4104

I forgot to keep track of how long I cooked them, but it was at least three hours. I checked them once in a while and took them out when the smallest ones were getting a bit too crispy. They smelled wonderful.

IMG_4123

I poured olive oil over them and added a clove of roasted garlic. These are destined to go into pasta soon, along with some chard from the CSA.

IMG_4125

Don’t they look beautiful?